Rev. Anthony Ronald Patrick Arthur Hart-Synnot[1]

Male 1917 - 1974  (57 years)


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  • Name Anthony Ronald Patrick Arthur Hart-Synnot 
    Prefix Rev. 
    Born 28 Mar 1917  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Gender Male 
    Baptism 5 May 1917  Salisbury, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Address:
    Salisbury Cathedral 
    _UID 85E3AB60AE3F4B008EF0ACD80987A8D6BBC1 
    Died 4 Dec 1974  St Albans, Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 5
    Person ID I9069  Treefive
    Last Modified 30 May 2019 

    Father Ronald Victor Okes Hart-Synnot, DSO. OBE,   b. 24 Jul 1879, Ballymoyer, County Armagh, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Apr 1976, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 96 years) 
    Mother Violet Mary Emily Maud Butler,   b. 22 Apr 1889, London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Sep 1973, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Married 11 Apr 1912  Hollingbourn, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 6, 7, 8
    Family ID F2578  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 


    • In addition to the 2 biographies below, there was an address by Robert Runcie, Bishop of St Slbans, at Anthony Hart-Synnot's funeral which expresses similar sentiments. Runcie went on to become the Archbishop of Canterbury.

      Biography of Anthony Hart-Synnot from:
      http://www.sopwellmemories.org.uk/rev-anthony-hart-synnot/ - posted 5 January 2014, accessed 23 Nov 2014:

      Rev. Anthony Hart-Synnot

      Anthony Hart-Synnot was appointed vicar of St Stephen’s church in Watling Street in 1955. He succeeded Canon Harding. Born in 1917 of a very distinguished family, Anthony was a very colourful character, some would say eccentric, and many people have fond memories of him. He was very outspoken and would not hesitate to put his thoughts in the parish magazine for which he was often hauled over the coals. He used to deliver the magazines himself and would often stop for refreshments. Residents say that he would stop their vehicles to obtain lifts and sometimes would take collections on buses. He was fond of football and encouraging the young to play. Many people remember him wearing football boots while performing marriage ceremonies in order to be ready for football practice afterwards. He ran a boys club in the church and there were many complaints about the boys’ unruly behaviour. Above all he was a very generous man living by Christian principles. He would often give away money and possessions to the poor and needy, especially homeless youths. Many of these youths took advantage of his generosity and moved into the vicarage. They did so much damage that the vicarage had to be demolished. In December 1974, the Rev. Hart-Synnot took his own life and was found dead in the vestry. His funeral was very well attended and reported in the local press.

      Biography of Anthony Hart-Synnot by Aidan Synnott of Dublin, 31 Dec 2016:

      IFR’1976: Rev(Lieutenant) ***Anthony Ronald Patrick Hart-Synnott (aka‘The Rev’ 1917-04.12.1974)
      The Hart-Synnot family’s last born and only offspring of the name and generation, Major RVO Hart-Synnot’s only son, the brilliant, sporting, prodigiously talented and remarkably Christian vicar, Rev ARPArthur Hart-Synnot. A former Lieutenant in the APC (Army Pay Corps) 1946-1948.

      Educated at Eton (Captain of School), France, Germany, Christ Church Coll.-Oxford (BA 1941, MA 1943) and Cuddeston TC (1950-1952). Service as Temporary Assistant Principal at the War Ministry 1940-1945 (while up at Oxford), and then again 1948-1949 (post graduation), and active service as trooper with the Royal Armoured Corps in 1945. More temporarily, tediously and briefly articled with Whinney Smith and Whinney (later Ernst&Whinney, then and now Ernst&Young) ‘Chartered Accountants’ of London, prior to more earnest study at Theological College, Cuddeston in 1949. Gained a final ordination into his 2nd spiritual Ministry, that with the Church of England ‘1952.

      Following his curacy at St Catherines in Hatcham 1952-1955, appointed Vicar of St Stephens, St Albans 1955-1972, and after much sacrifice, holy service and great effort, Rev Anthony d. unm., and dsp., so tragically early in late 1974. The Reverend Anthony’s Christian faith was clearly expressed by his obdurate rejection of the comforts of the material world. He had equally a consuming devotion to caring and sharing, often literally his available cash, with those less fortunate who crossed his path and cared to quickly bless his Church. He was an early exemplar of ‘welcoming inclusivity’, and as the final oration of his Bishop observed, he made “the unwanted feel accepted, and the dull feel worthwhile” [some think this a sin, ABS]. This focus manifested itself particularly in his dedication to the most troubled of the parish, the troubled youth, those of whom there are always too many. He mentored a better way of living, and he lived his Christian Gospel not only through service to others, but by service to others … and sinners. When he met with disappointment in those others, he tended to turn the other cheek, as his Bible would bid. He was even an example to his brother clergy in some ways, but of course as his Bishop did also attest, not in all ways. He administered and organised his many local activities and recreations with energy and infectious enthusiasm, the sporting pursuits and the football teams, the Jumble sales, the Vicarage clubs, the educational outings and the enjoyable hiking excursions. Despite their blessing, those troubled of the flock ultimately left the holy ground where they had walked a barren and despoiled place indeed, and their shepherd home left as a cupboard that was bare. Many came looking for help, many stayed and took advantage, and many took and walked with what was’nt theirs. Rev Hart-Synnot though he had often threatened any miscreants participating of his hospitality with the phrase “I’ll get the law”, the sanction rule-book that he imposed ultimately however , was more of the next more spiritual world than this merely temporal one. A generous Christian and a sad loss!

      The Vicarage site was redeveloped after ‘the Revs’ death in 1974, redeveloped as the Vicarage or St Stephens Close. It is therefore as it stands today, a form of monument that survived its final ministry, unlike the Vicarage itself. Rev Anthony Hart-Synnot’s tragic decease, reportedly at his own hand, was kindly and sympathetically remembered by his Bishop the Rt Reverend Robert Runcie (later Archbishop Runcie, ex Lambeth Palace, Archbishop of Canterbury) and his many and varied flock at memorial service, in St Albans, Saturday 14th Dec.’1974. Church of England and St Stephens.

  • Sources 
    1. [S2713] BOK Burke - Burke's Irish Family Records (1976), page 1089-1092 (Hart-Synnot).

    2. [S2298] TRE Family tree - Milne family tree (owner david468_1) family tree on ancestry.com accessed 12 Jul 2014, Anthony Ronald Patrick Arthur Hart-Synnot.

    3. [S2299] TRE Family tree - Ancestors(1) family tree (owner Tracy Mallen) family tree on ancestry.com accessed 12 Jul 2014, Anthony Ronald Patrick Arthur Hart-Synnot.

    4. [S3184] BIR Birth freebmd.org, Anthony R P A Synnot; Salisbury; 5a; 241; June 1917.

    5. [S3097] FreeBMD, FreeBMD UK Death Index, freebmd.org.uk, Anthony Ronald P A Hart-Synnot, DoB 28MR1917, Dist. St Albans, Vol 10, p. 740.

    6. [S2298] TRE Family tree - Milne family tree (owner david468_1) family tree on ancestry.com accessed 12 Jul 2014, Ronald Victor Okes Hart-Synnot.

    7. [S2299] TRE Family tree - Ancestors(1) family tree (owner Tracy Mallen) family tree on ancestry.com accessed 12 Jul 2014, Ronald Victor Okes Hart-Synnot.

    8. [S2610] FreeBMD England & Wales, FreeBMD Marriage Index, 1837-1915 (ancestry.com), 1912 Hart-Synnot, Ronald V O and Butler, Violet M E M, Hollingbourn, Kent, Jun 1912, vol 2a, page 1831.