Emily Qualtrough

Emily Qualtrough

Female 1855 - 1941  (86 years)

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  • Name Emily Qualtrough 
    Born 1855  Arbory, Rushen, Isle of Man Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    _FSFTID KZ6W-25H 
    _UID E9B7D0C3993A469BBB0F6CC9D5D6D3187CB3 
    Died 11 Oct 1941  Auckland, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Pakuranga, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Address:
    Pakuranga Cemetery 
    Person ID I499  Treefive
    Last Modified 12 Sep 2013 

    Father James Qualtrough,   b. 26 Dec 1808, Arbory, Rushen, Isle of Man Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Oct 1881, Pakuranga, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Mother Catherine Clague,   b. 15 Apr 1810, Malew, Isle of Man Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jun 1881, Pakuranga, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Married 12 Nov 1835  Malew, Isle of Man Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Family ID F117  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    00036 Emily Qualtrough - nurse  abt 1890
    00036 Emily Qualtrough - nurse abt 1890
    00037 Sarah Haddock and Emily Qualtrough
    00037 Sarah Haddock and Emily Qualtrough
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

  • Notes 


    • EMILY QUALTROUGH (1855-1941) – professional nurse.

      This biography is transcribed from chapter 7 of A Quota of Qualtroughs (authors Elizabeth A. Barlow and Joy McDougall, published in Matamata, New Zealand by Elizabeth A. Barlow in 1984), by kind permission of Elizabeth Feisst. For further information on Qualtroughs worldwide see http://www/qualtrough.org.

      Text in square brackets [ ] refers to matters in A Quota of Qualtroughs that are not included in the biography below.
      --------------------
      EMILY, the youngest Qualtrough child, also remained single but we know more about her because she lived to the age of 86 and was a very family-conscious person who kept in touch with kith and kin.

      She learned nursing skills and, following the death of her parents, went out on private cases, looking after patients in their own homes. She moved about the countryside attending cases as far apart as Hamilton, Thames and Auckland. Her patients included some notable people of the day for not only was she regarded as a good nurse but as a very special sort of person.

      Fair-complexioned and blue-eyed, she was gentle and smiling, devoted to her church. “Saintly” and “angelic” are words often used to describe her nature and she abhorred vulgarity.

      A great-niece, Mary Gavin, recalls that it distressed Aunt Emily to hear people swear. Why, she would ask, could they not give vent to their feelings just as easily and far less coarsely with, “Oh, scissors! Oh, needles! Oh, pins!”
      As well as a good nurse she was a good cook, though it was said that when Emily baked there would be a trail of flour from one end of the house to the other.

      After retiring from nursing Emily gave much of her time to church work and took an interest in the Auckland Manx Society. She was living with her nieces Evie and Bell Haddock in Pratt Street, Ponsonby and to those of us who can remember her in those later years, she was the epitome of the ‘little old lady passing by’ of a song popular at the time, dressed formally in gloves and with a hatpin holding a modest black straw hat on her silver head and smelling faintly of lavender water. She would clasp teenage relations to her bosom and murmur, “Dear child!”

      Ever family-conscious, it was a sorrow to her that the Qualtrough name would die out with the demise of her brother Thomas’ only son, Jim. Of her brothers, only Willie and Tom had produced families, and Willy’s brood of eight were all girls, Tom’s five other children daughters.

      Jim Qualtrough had married in 1927, but nearly 14 years later he was still childless. Then came the news that a baby was on the way. Aunt Emily’s delight could hardly be contained with the news, “It’s a boy!”

      Emily asked Jim and his wife Minnie a special favour – could the baby be christened in the family church at Pakuranga? Arrangements were duly made and baby Malcolm James Qualtrough was welcomed into the Methodist Church on Sunday 12 October 1941.

      But his little Great-Aunt Emily was not there to savour the moment. She had been ailing for some months and perhaps the excitement of it all had been too much for her for she collapsed and died on the Saturday night prior to the christening. The family carried on with her wishes, however, as all arrangements had been made. It was a poignant hour though for relations who had attended the christening to see Emily’s coffin resting on the spot beneath the altar where the longed-for male descendant had been baptised only the day before.

      Emily was interred in the graveyard beside the church she had loved all her life. She had, in 1929, set up a Trust of £100 (sterling) for the upkeep of the property as it had at that time, through disuse, become neglected. The interest on this money was used for the purpose until the building was officially handed over to the Howick Historical Society. [(See Genealogical Chart 4)]

  • Sources 
    1. [S291] MAR012 Marriage Qualtrough, James and Clague, Catherine.